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New issue Florida Fly Fishing Magazine Online Vol 3 # 4

The new issue of Florida Fly Fishing Magazine is hot off the presses. If you are not familiar with this magazine and enjoy fly fishing especially in the South East then you don't want to miss this.

Enjoy!

Jeff Putnam fly fishing school has one spot open!

Spey casting class with the incomparable Jeff PuthamSpey casting class with the incomparable Jeff Putham
Casters, I have one space left for this weekends Spey Casting Camp. Its a 2-Day, spey filled school taught on the American River that will allow you to immerse yourself in "everything spey", both double handed and single handed rods. We'll even cover fishing and maybe even catch a shad or two. Cost is only $350 for both days including lunch and gear if needed. Check the following link for more info (or call me at 916-366-7554 for the last reservation):
http://www.jpflyfishing.com/groupclasses/onthewaterclasses/speycastingca...

Thank you, Jeff Putnam

Hogan says it is time to wet a line...and we agree!

Fly fishing with Off the Hook and guide Hogan Brown: fly fishing photo from the Lower Sacramento RiverFly fishing with Off the Hook and guide Hogan Brown: fly fishing photo from the Lower Sacramento River
With June 3 weeks away summer is nearly officially and un-officially here. Many rivers are coming into shape as run off subsides but with reservoirs feet from being filled I imagine there maybe a second wave of run off when we get some consistent HOT weather and the night time temps stay hot as well. Here is what is happening and what is coming up.

Lower Yuba has dropped into shape and is stable at 2337 cfs with good clarity. Fishing has been good. Hatches should pick up over the next few weeks as the river settles into the new flow. We are entering prime time on the Lower Yuba for spring/early summer hatches. The weeks following run off see PMD, caddis, stoneflies, and all sorts of mixed hatches kicking into gear. Fish will be on the grab coming off high and off color flows and fishing will only get better as we move through June and July.

Nice Lower Sac BowNice Lower Sac Bow

Lower Sacramento River is still fishing consistent for trout up through redding but I have began to turn my attention to the lower river looking for shad, stripers, bass, and carp. Shad fishing is picking up as people are starting to catch a few here and a few there down around Princeton up through chico. Flows have been hovering around 10,000cfs coming out of Keswick but drop down to around 7000cfs around Ord Bend as we are in the middle of Rice Irrigation season. Once that is over here shortly the river down by Chico/Ord Bend should jump up moving fish up the river. This will also help move the migratory stripers up river and give the resident fish a bit more water making them a bit more comfortable. Smallies and Big mouth bass are waking up in the sloughs and I have seen a few fish up on beds and cruising the shallows. It is going to be getting really good really soon out there.

Yosemite Range of Light

Take a couple minutes from your day to watch this outstanding piece (do it in full screen). Any stress you are dealing with in your will be knocked down a notch or two after this.

Fly fishing footage from Truckee and Pyramid Lake from Gotta Stay Fly Productions

Now is the time to hit Pyramid. The weather is getting more predictable and slightly warmer.

Charged by an angry Bull!?!?

One In Winter - fly fishing film by Ryan Peterson

Here is a great short film about targeting California Coastal Steelhead made by Ryan Petersen from The Fly Shop. Make sure to read his thought provoking words below as well.

One in Winter from ryan peterson on Vimeo.

We understand mere fragments –

of most things really, but especially of a fish called steelhead. Its nominal definition goes that it’s a rainbow trout that migrates from river to ocean and back again to spawn, like a salmon. But like most living things, after you dedicate time to deep observation, their essential superpowers transcend human understanding. Just ask a grooved-out steelhead fly fisher.

In doing so you might hear how, for instance, steelhead have been tagged in Oregonian rivers and recaptured years later off the coast of Japan. You will then be entreated to confirm that that’s crazy, right?!

You might also be regaled by the legend that high-seas commercial fishermen rarely intercept steelhead as bycatch in their nets, suggesting a steelhead’s epic peregrinations are committed to solo, without friends in schools. They’re lone wolves out there, mysterious and supremely noble in the icy gray – the ultimate, fitting match for someone unimpressed by the listlessness of day-to-day society.

At that, you’ll be encouraged to exclaim something to the effect of, “What?!” or “Whoa!”

Then ask the steelhead angler about the special ones that run into rivers in the dead of winter and watch as their frantic code-red tone trails off. They fall silent, look you in the eye, and quietly, carefully size up whether you really care, or whether you’re just humoring them. Because now you’re talking about very serious stuff.

In general, the drama and excitement of fly fishing takes place almost entirely in your head. No matter what kind of fish you’re trying to trick, there’s always more time spent standing stone-still in a river, thinking about it, than there is with a fish actually on the line. The sub-discipline of winter steelheading stretches this to its threadbare extreme: The gap is immense. Sometimes it goes on for a whole winter. It’s all mind, for virtually no matter.

Sounds boring, I know, but there are no other “sports” in which the crucial defining moments revolve around a literal connection to another form of life. This is interesting to me. We often forget, ignore, or underestimate that humans are for better or (more often) for worse, the planet’s top predator. And even when we confront this fact, it’s usually only in the abstract. We are so far up the food chain these days we can get our food with money.

But fly fishing is not abstract. To catch a fish you must to step into an ecosystem, consider where you are, where your quarry came from, where it is going, why it might be hanging out in an eddy rather than in traffic, and why you are catching more or fewer of them this year compared to last. To catch a fish, the old saying goes, you must think like one. It’s so true.

If you watch a fly fisher trying for winter steelhead, you will not see any great feats of athleticism, and you certainly will not see any death-defying shockers. Ninety nine point nine percent of the time what you will see is exquisite patience and contemplation.

But if you watch a seriously steezy river-man like Rich Zellman long enough, you might, with luck, after days and days, catch a fragment.

Clapton on fly fishing.

Eric Clapton discusses his personal reasons for fly fishing and catches a nice Grayling on this video. Clapton on fly fishing

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